What Is A Mom To Do When Dad's House Is More Fun?

HOW DO I COMPETE WHEN MY EX IS THE "FUN" ONE?

photocredit

MOLLY: This question came from a reader in Michigan. She added that her girlfriend has her son all week and is "responsible for taking him to all his extracurriculars, doing homework, bathing… His two weekends a month that he's with his Dad are spent lying on the couch eating pizza and playing Wii. On the occasion that the son gets to choose who he wants to be with, guess who he chooses? And it breaks her heart. What can she do?"


Dr. Susan Rutherford (MOM): 
 I can see why she would feel resentful. The famous term for that is the “Disneyland Dad,” where the part-time parent provides all the fun, none of the discipline, and none of the regulation of the child’s life. It's hard to fault a child for being seduced by short-term stays in a rule-less utopia over the daily grind of school, hygiene, homework, chores, activities, etc.

Even though the child states now that he prefers to be with the father, as time goes by, most children intuitively recognize where they receive the best care and flourish in a more structured environment. Kids do know this deep inside and they will prefer it for the long run even while they may enjoy letting it all go during the short periods spent with the other parent. Unfortunately, though, this attitude can feel hurtful to the primary parent who is doing the majority of the care.

Perhaps the Mom could ease her own work load with the child and try to build in time where they actually have fun together. A visit to a park or the zoo or even just out for ice cream can break up the regular routine and add fun to regular life. She could choose to let somethings go sometimes and not worry quite so much about the work that has to be done.

MOLLY: It’s hard though, don't I know it! Between bathing and school and homework and activities, our days with kids are jam packed, and I have a husband to help me get everything done.

MOM: Yes it’s true, it is but you don’t want it quite as lopsided as this family is. The truth is she has absolutely no control over what goes on in the ex-husband’s household. She can ask him to help out with the reading and some of the other kinds of chores but she can’t make him follow her household's routine. If he chooses not to, he won’t. She can only regulate what goes on in her own house. While there are certainly normal, every day things that have to go on in a child’s life, it’s probably worth letting the house get a little messy and if that's what needs to be sacrificed in the name of having some fun time with your kid.

MOLLY: Should she talk to her son about how she doesn’t always want to be the enforcer parent?

MOM: Yes, she can talk about.....


Read the rest of Dr. Rutherford's advice at Conversations With My Mother.com

Molly Skyar and Dr. Rutherford are behind “Conversations With My Mother”: a blog about raising kids and how our parenting decisions now can have long term effects.

Dr. Rutherford is a Clinical Psychologist in practice for over 30 years. She has degrees from Duke University, New York University (NYU), and the University of Denver.
Molly is Dr. Rutherford's younger daughter and the mother of two children under six.

 

Views: 14

Tags: divorced parents, divorced with children,, how to co-parent,

Comment

You need to be a member of Mom Bloggers Club to add comments!

Join Mom Bloggers Club

MARKETPLACE

ADVERTISEMENT

Link to Us

Loading…

© 2014   Created by Mom Bloggers Club.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service